Can I Move Out of State with My Children After the Divorce?

On behalf of The Law Office of Wickersham and Bowers posted in Family Law on Friday December 9th, 2022.

Divorce comes with many complications, and having children adds up to it. Usually, after divorce, you plan to move on with your life, but moving out of state can be tricky if you have children. The court primarily decides child custody based on the parenting plan.

It depends on whether you have sole custody, joint custody, split custody, or visitation right. It is easier to move states if you have sole custody of the children and can make decisions. Still, the terms must be decided in court.

Court Permission to Move Out of State

It is obligatory in many states to get permission from the court before moving to another state with your children. The request is accepted or rejected according to the modification order. Even if you have sole custody, you will still need the court’s permission before moving out of state.

In most cases, you need to get permission from the other parent in order to get the request accepted. If both parties agree to this decision, granting permission from the court is merely a matter of filling out the necessary documents. The agreement papers are included in the modification plan and reviewed and signed by the judge.

If the other parents object to the move, it may become difficult to convince the court. However, avoid using written agreements between both parents without court permission. If the other parent changes their mind in the future, it can cost you a whole trip back to the original state.

What to do If the Other Parent Objects?

The court grants permission for the move under different considerations.

  • It will be easier to move if the move is mandatory and due to employment purposes. Assuring the court with a better income and lifestyle for the children helps you even more.
  • If the visiting time of the other parent is less, e.g., a few times a month, the move becomes easier.
  • If the state you are moving to is near, e.g., a couple of hours away, it can also help you get permission from the court.

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